wooerofevil:

The quickest gif I have ever made in my life, I literally hopped on just to do this because NO ONE ELSE HAS MADE IT YET. I gave you the mandated 4.3 seconds, internet. I’m disappointed.
Anyway, Mark is super fucking adorable whenever he gets something right so deal with that. x

wooerofevil:

The quickest gif I have ever made in my life, I literally hopped on just to do this because NO ONE ELSE HAS MADE IT YET. I gave you the mandated 4.3 seconds, internet. I’m disappointed.

Anyway, Mark is super fucking adorable whenever he gets something right so deal with that. x

ginathethundergoddess:

glasmond:

weloveshortvideos:

Run for your lives!

I can’t believe it

THIS IS MY OTHER FAVOIRTE VINE

strayer-blog:

Tuesday, 21. 10. 2014

Start reading on SmackJeeves and follow our blog to keep up with the updates! You can also read the german version on Animexx or MyComics! Plus: We now have a comic-only-tumblr! So feel free to go ahead to strayer-comic and follow us, so you’ll never miss an update!

NEWS: Feel free to visit our new ask-blog askthestrayercast and leave our cast a question!

earlgreymartini:

strelok-the-marked-one:

hokuto-ju-no-ken:

tits-in-a-toboggan:

I wasn’t aware that strong, sexually empowered women are in fact a demeaning social trope.
If you had ever played the games, or even mildly researched them, you’d know that Bayonetta is both highly sexualized for the benefit of the viewer AS WELL as being sexually empowered for herself. If you want to hate the former, you have to hate the latter, and that’s rather misogynistic, don’t you think?

Also, just gonna toss this out there: Bayonetta’s designer, Mari Shimazaki, has said that she designed Bayonetta as a power fantasy for herself and that Bayonetta’s personality and attitude is “what she aspires to be more like” because she wants to feel sexy for her own sake, not society’s and also she’s tired of women being both expected to and being shamed for trying to look beautiful. She simply wants to feel powerful, but also beautiful.



See thing is this shit is actually pretty complicated.
In the same way that we have to be mindful that games are designed by people (someone designed, scripted and coded all those scenes shown in Tropes Vs Women, whether you think they’re ‘cherry picked’ or not); we must also remember that multiple people work on a single title, and the politics of a game can come from many sources.
I LOVE Shimazaki’s work. You can tell that she works in a lot of love for high fashion as well as her own preferences of what it means to look cool, sexy and dangerous.
There are some very convincing readings of Bayonetta 1 that represent Bayonetta the character and the game’s plot as something feminist and empowering (you are, after all taking on a patriarchal cult using the very tools that were used to oppress you and your kind); but that reading requires death of the author to work.
Because (unfortunately, IMO), Hideki Kamiya is a thing. For all that Mari Shimazaki says, for all of the empowering academic readings you can find, Hideki Kamiya has pretty much never talked about Bayonetta as a character without mentioning how much of a sex object she is. That’s sex object, not like, sexual force of nature or anything.
Any designs or opinions Shimazaki has are filtered through Kamiya to appear in the end project. His opinions are almost literally final.
If you’ve looked through the Bayonetta 1 art book (It’s called The Eyes of Bayonetta, it has like, 50 pages of Shimazaki costume design and SMH if you’re a fan of this game and don’t have it), there is a notable discord between Shimazaki talking about her design decisions, and Kamiya talking about why he asked for certain design decisions.
There’s a particularly gross part where he talks about how he insisted that there be an alternate costume for Bayo that’s Japanese school gym clothes (y’know, those super anime short-shorts that real JP schools no longer have students wear because it’s too pedo), and roped the 3D modeller to make a whole bunch of renders of it for Kanmiya to wear on t-shirts.
The funny side of this being the 3D modeller also states in the book that he had to break model’s rigging to get Bayo into the poses Kamiya wanted. Escher Girls was right, yo.
Then there’s that whole thing where Kamiya in an interview said that the Vs Joy scene in Bayo 1 was there because he thought that women, even strangers, were inherently competitive against each other. Oh boy.
I REALLY like Bayonetta. It’s one of my favourite games ever. I wish I also had those glasses and gun heels. But it would be a bald-faced fucking lie to think that aesthetic design decisions aren’t heavily grounded in what gives straight dudes (or at least what gives Kamiya) a chubby.

Not to mention that things like internalized misogyny exists as well as the fact that a character can never choose to be sexual for themselves. They are only characters and only the people who create them choose this. A character can´t be sexually empowered for themselves, because they do not exist. It can be part of their characterization, but especially in regards to extremely uncomfortable clothes for combat, many of those “empowered” women wear, I doubt that it´s actually for them. The examples above are an all to well prove for this.
As any form of media, video games will be received differently by different people, even in the creation of a character as shown here (where two people involved in the process view the same character very different). 
It´s also to note, that many things we perceive as “normal” are maybe a little bit twisted and that also female creators can create sex objects or poorly written female characters and that we also fall into tropes
(To not get anybody confused, I think Bayonettas character is a pretty neat concept and I like her design, but broken anatomy and impractical battle outfits bug me in general). 

earlgreymartini:

strelok-the-marked-one:

hokuto-ju-no-ken:

tits-in-a-toboggan:

I wasn’t aware that strong, sexually empowered women are in fact a demeaning social trope.

If you had ever played the games, or even mildly researched them, you’d know that Bayonetta is both highly sexualized for the benefit of the viewer AS WELL as being sexually empowered for herself. If you want to hate the former, you have to hate the latter, and that’s rather misogynistic, don’t you think?

Also, just gonna toss this out there: Bayonetta’s designer, Mari Shimazaki, has said that she designed Bayonetta as a power fantasy for herself and that Bayonetta’s personality and attitude is “what she aspires to be more like” because she wants to feel sexy for her own sake, not society’s and also she’s tired of women being both expected to and being shamed for trying to look beautiful. She simply wants to feel powerful, but also beautiful.

See thing is this shit is actually pretty complicated.

In the same way that we have to be mindful that games are designed by people (someone designed, scripted and coded all those scenes shown in Tropes Vs Women, whether you think they’re ‘cherry picked’ or not); we must also remember that multiple people work on a single title, and the politics of a game can come from many sources.

I LOVE Shimazaki’s work. You can tell that she works in a lot of love for high fashion as well as her own preferences of what it means to look cool, sexy and dangerous.

There are some very convincing readings of Bayonetta 1 that represent Bayonetta the character and the game’s plot as something feminist and empowering (you are, after all taking on a patriarchal cult using the very tools that were used to oppress you and your kind); but that reading requires death of the author to work.

Because (unfortunately, IMO), Hideki Kamiya is a thing. For all that Mari Shimazaki says, for all of the empowering academic readings you can find, Hideki Kamiya has pretty much never talked about Bayonetta as a character without mentioning how much of a sex object she is. That’s sex object, not like, sexual force of nature or anything.

Any designs or opinions Shimazaki has are filtered through Kamiya to appear in the end project. His opinions are almost literally final.

If you’ve looked through the Bayonetta 1 art book (It’s called The Eyes of Bayonetta, it has like, 50 pages of Shimazaki costume design and SMH if you’re a fan of this game and don’t have it), there is a notable discord between Shimazaki talking about her design decisions, and Kamiya talking about why he asked for certain design decisions.

There’s a particularly gross part where he talks about how he insisted that there be an alternate costume for Bayo that’s Japanese school gym clothes (y’know, those super anime short-shorts that real JP schools no longer have students wear because it’s too pedo), and roped the 3D modeller to make a whole bunch of renders of it for Kanmiya to wear on t-shirts.

The funny side of this being the 3D modeller also states in the book that he had to break model’s rigging to get Bayo into the poses Kamiya wanted. Escher Girls was right, yo.

Then there’s that whole thing where Kamiya in an interview said that the Vs Joy scene in Bayo 1 was there because he thought that women, even strangers, were inherently competitive against each other. Oh boy.

I REALLY like Bayonetta. It’s one of my favourite games ever. I wish I also had those glasses and gun heels. But it would be a bald-faced fucking lie to think that aesthetic design decisions aren’t heavily grounded in what gives straight dudes (or at least what gives Kamiya) a chubby.

Not to mention that things like internalized misogyny exists as well as the fact that a character can never choose to be sexual for themselves. They are only characters and only the people who create them choose this. A character can´t be sexually empowered for themselves, because they do not exist. It can be part of their characterization, but especially in regards to extremely uncomfortable clothes for combat, many of those “empowered” women wear, I doubt that it´s actually for them. The examples above are an all to well prove for this.

As any form of media, video games will be received differently by different people, even in the creation of a character as shown here (where two people involved in the process view the same character very different). 

It´s also to note, that many things we perceive as “normal” are maybe a little bit twisted and that also female creators can create sex objects or poorly written female characters and that we also fall into tropes

(To not get anybody confused, I think Bayonettas character is a pretty neat concept and I like her design, but broken anatomy and impractical battle outfits bug me in general). 

usscucuboth:

Starfleet uniforms, c.2350-2365

askhakogaku:

((and then the gym exploded))

nauseabonde:

when somebody joins tumblr

did-you-kno:

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a Mexican holiday that begins on November 1st, but it’s the opposite of Halloween. It brings families together to honor the dead, while Halloween is about scaring spirits away. Source

did-you-kno:

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a Mexican holiday that begins on November 1st, but it’s the opposite of Halloween. It brings families together to honor the dead, while Halloween is about scaring spirits away. Source

ilovenarcisse:

Team Avatar